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Designing for a difference – Part 2

Deepa Umesh, Head of Delivery, Appearition India, talks on how design makes a difference in Branding, Digital Transformation and more:

– How to achieve branding using design?

Consistency is the key to branding. We drive the end user to build a perception of our brand through design. If there is a disconnect in a medium or between digital and physical communication or design, the ability to identify our brand is lost.

A repeated systematic approach will provide the solution to business branding. It is a journey not a process that is definitive.

Imagination + Creativity + Empathy + Innovation results in Value creation.

Along with these components, conducting a SWOT analysis will help in market segmentation and identifying targets. It gives an outline to a pragmatic and holistic approach.

Semiotics – the study of symbols opens more avenues in terms of design as these are based on language and culture. Human Psychology + Semiotics lead to solution building – a spot where design plays a pivotal role.

In recent years, symbols have replaced text. Symbols indicate, designate, and process the visuals. This results in creating a likeness, providing an analogy and acts as a metaphor for the objects that symbol represent.

A culmination of the above-mentioned aspect(s) leads to clarity, consistency and credibility of branding.

Thus, Branding is automatically achieved when we focus on the solution as opposed to the problem.

– Digital Transformation: What will be the role of a design in this next big thing?

As we know, design facilitates that oneness in tone and thinking. To me, being able to change what we do and how we do forms the crux of digital transformation. Design plays the crucial role in being able to set the tone, track and deliver it.

Design is constantly evolving with time and technology-your task is to take puzzle pieces and make the final picture without knowing how it should look. The key isn’t gathering a lot of pieces, it’s gathering all the right pieces.

Mapping and analysing, an activity reliant on design, is the underlying factor that lets you take stock of the direction you’re moving toward. Furthermore, demographics and psychographics play a key role in deciding how we go about designing change.

People might think design to be as simple as creating fancy logos with Photoshop or any other software you can get your hands on but what they don’t realize is all the back-end work that goes into the final product which conveys the innate depth of a company’s mission and vision.

– According to you, what are the factors to consider when balancing content and design to deliver the best product? 

Content dictates the design form. We are amid multitudes of communication channels such Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Snapchat, Pinterest etc. Each of these mediums have developed a form of presentation and content for itself. So much so that when we colloquially say, ‘write a tweet’, people understand that it is within 280 characters. Thus, social media has given a whole new meaning to the term ‘in a nut shell.’ And design wise, 1080 x 1080 has become the new informal standard for pictures on Facebook and Twitter whereas WhatsApp and Snapchat are a whole new ball game.

Freedom and the kind of work we do decides what we design or how we design. A newspaper design depends on the content, an advertisement can be designed to be bold and bright. In the same scenario, content will be in-depth in a newspaper and very minimal for an ad. The best of both worlds can be achieved when we know the end product we are working towards delivering.

Also, they work in tangent to one another and cannot function independently.

To be able to deliver quality content, we need to accurately plan out how we convey what we convey – should the design be bold and represent our company culture or should it play second fiddle to text which will drive the background design.

As long as we are clear on this aspect, we can always deliver the best of both worlds. Like I said, content and design are very much interdependent.

If it keeps on rainin, the levee’s gonna break.

It is common knowledge that as technology evolves, individuals are becoming more informed and driven to create content aligned to their passions. Think about the content you are seeing in your social feeds – your colleague’s oddball memes, Aunt Sue with puppy’s ears and your old school mate Trevor Lam and his latest “work of art” – everyone around us is getting more and more able to express their creativity and publish it too. Facebook Augmented Reality (AR) is going to allow people to express themselves a whole lot more.

 

Give everyone the power to share anything with anyone.

– Mark Zuckerberg

 

What is F8 – and why should you care?

The Facebook Developers conference (F8) was first hosted in 2007 – where the team at FB presented the social graph – or a rendition of the concept of a social network. Subsequent editions of F8 hosted similarly theoretical principles behind the evolution of the behemoth that FB is today. Essentially, this is the conference where they announce their next plans, and given how integrated FB is in our lives today – you might want to be aware of what’s ahead.

 

F8 2017: Facebook Augmented Reality

Earlier this week, at F8 2017, Mark Zuckerberg (Zuck!) shared an update on the next phase of FB’s 10-year product plan, originally shared in at F8 2016. Commencing with some warm up jokes about the release of Fast and the Furious 8 (the “other” F8 ) this week, Zuck proceeded to give us a snapshot of how FB plans to integrate AR into camera functions in their apps.

 

Click to read: Business Insider’s article on the release of the FB 10-year plan

Mark Zuckerberg’s keynote from Day 1 of F8

 

FB, AR & Cameras – how do they come together?

In recent times, the FB family of apps (FB, Messenger, Instagram & Whatsapp) have seen the integration of camera icons across the board – enabling functions such as video conferencing. While these changes have gone unnoticed by some, it is estimated that the FB messenger app has 1.2 billion monthly users.

 

Facebook-Messenger-Video-Calling

FB Messenger with camera Icon (Source: Forbes)

Click to read: Forbes article on Facebook Messenger passing 1.2 billion users

 

And how does AR fit into this equation?

Zuck went on to share a common understanding that AR is essentially used for three key purposes;

  • The overlay of data onto the physical reality around us – such as messages or information
  • The ability to add digital objects into our surroundings – like a virtual television or gaming avatars
  • Enhancements to physical objects around us – like buildings or human faces.

Facebook Augmented Reality will work by aggregating these tools – the cameras within FB apps will allow users to create AR “experiences” – and they will seem quite familiar once you see them. AR is not rare – we’ve all seen it in one form or the other – quite possibly most recently in the form of Pokemon Go.

Now, we all know that Pokemon Go was a huge driver in bringing AR to the mainstream – even if it was little more than a temporary fad for most. You’ve also undoubtedly heard us go on about how the popularity of the game was influential in the voluminous cash injection industry players received in 2016. But this could very well be, to quote Led Zeppelin, when the levee’s gonna break.

 

Where might you have seen AR in action?

Some use cases we’ve found interesting

 

So how does it all work exactly? (A splash of technical jargon)

This vision comes to life with the incorporation of some technological building blocks;

  • Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) – a technique borrowed from Artificial intelligence – enabling users to integrate digital elements into the reality in front of them
  • 3D effects – capturing and interacting with scenes that you can explore and effects that you can adjust
  • Object recognition – technology that can identify items around you, that can then be targets for the overlay of digital content

 

What about Virtual Reality?

AR and Virtual Reality align quite well, and in that vein, FB is launching a platform called Facebook spaces – where you can interact with people in a virtual environment through the Oculus Rift.

 

Facebook spaces (from F8 2017)

Meanwhile, we’ve been doing our own experiments with the Rift too!

image1 (1)

 

 

Early days in terms of adoption – and the plan for an open platform

Zuck reiterated a key message around AR: It is yet in a rudimentary phase of development – and most of the use cases around us are still evolving too. Don’t expect the world to change overnight.

That being said, in offering an open platform and leveraging the huge universe that lives on FB – users will be able to create AR experiences on their own, and share them online. In doing so, new users will have access to parallel creations by fellow users from around the internet.

This spike in available content will invariably help everyone around us find AR experiences that fit their fancy – especially if this punt from FB is a good one – and at Appearition, we certainly believe Facebook Augmented Reality is going to be something special for all of us.