How VR will drive supply chain

Deeptha Sreedhar

Deeptha Sreedhar

I’m a Chennai-based Writer and Journalist. I handle the Digital Content for Appearition. My super-cool colleagues design, innovate and create magic in Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Mixed Reality. I use this space to present their magic in text. When I am not editing or scouring for story ideas one bit before hell breaks loose, I enjoy reading crime-fiction books and watching similar television series, do a bit of experimental cooking and some travel to wherever my bank balance supports upon paying all bills.
Deeptha Sreedhar

Latest posts by Deeptha Sreedhar (see all)

Virtual Reality is one of the fastest growing disruptive technologies. At the cusp of industry 4.0, enterprises are keenly using such innovative tech to provide enhanced solutions. With the arrival of consumer-friendly and affordable headsets or virtual reality glasses, VR tech has gone mainstream.

Supply chain management is one of the many fields that VR is revolutionising. Excerpts from the recent Deloitte report on ‘Utilizing virtual reality to drive supply chain innovation’:

VR can improve supply chain management in four main areas:

  1. product and process design
  2. data and process visualisation
  3. employee collaboration
  4. experience-based learning

VR is of big interest to companies with complex product development process and a need to globalise their collaboration. This is mainly because VR for enterprises simplifies or enhances an existing process rather than introduce a whole process. Furthermore, hardware and software capabilities in the tech have improved greatly, leading to easier adoption.

Deloitte recommends enterprises to begin with small pilots to test and validate applications that could have immediate benefit and scalability.

For example, VR can be used to superimpose important information directly onto the windshield. Without glancing at a handheld device, drivers can see alternate routes, blocked roads and traffic snags. Information about the load can be seen without the need to stop, climb into the back of the truck, and see what’s going on. For example, a driver carrying a temperature controlled load can see if there’s an issue with the thermostat and if the temperature is approaching a predetermined danger zone.

‘As VR applications continue to expand and prices continuously decrease, the VR market alone could reach up to $48.5 billion by 2025.’

Primary potential benefits of VR

A primary value driver for organizations is VR’s interactive visualization capability. Companies are starting to leverage the technology within their design organizations to enhance CAD functionality and engineer employee engagement. The VR-enhanced designs allow for visualization capabilities previously unavailable; this allows product engineers, architects, and designers to rapidly shift through multiple designs and evaluate them on the spot. Automotive OEMs and large construction firms are partnering with design software companies and VR hardware manufacturers to create these immersive experiences.

 

 

 

Future of enterprise management

Virtual reality can drive true transformation in supply chain and operations. However, like every major change, it requires a strategic approach to begin deploying within a company. Leaders need to understand that shifting toward a completely new, virtual environment mandates a shift in culture toward innovation, openness, and collaboration.

The blog is a rewritten excerpt from Deloitte.

Images courtesy: Deloitte